Outcast Europe

Memories of Displacement and Movement

Outcast Europe

Frame and photograph

Framed photograph of Dimitrios and Anastasia Dadioti, Ayvalik, c.1900.

The Dadioti family belonged to the bourgeoisie of Kydonies (present day Ayvalik) in Asia Minor. In 1915, during the first persecution that the Greeks of Asia Minor were subjected to, the father of the family, Dimitris, was sent to the forced labor camps in Beli-keser, where he died of hardships a few months later. The mother, Anastasia, with the three children, Katina, Dimitra and Vaggelis, abandoned their home and moved temporarily to Istanbul. They came back from there in 1919 when the political circumstances seemed more favorable for the Greeks. The family left again, with the persecution of 1922,  first for Lesvos and then for Athens.

Pendant

Silver framed pendant of a byzantine coin of Jesus and Cross c.969-1188 AD that belonged to the Dadioti family.

The Dadioti family belonged to the bourgeoisie of Kydonies (present day Ayvalik) in Asia Minor. In 1915, during the first persecution that the Greeks of Asia Minor were subjected to, the father of the family, Dimitris, was sent to the forced labor camps in Beli-keser, where he died of hardships a few months later. The mother, Anastasia, with the three children, Katina, Dimitra and Vaggelis, abandoned their home and moved temporarily to Istanbul. They came back from there in 1919 when the political circumstances seemed more favorable for the Greeks. The family left again, with the persecution of 1922, first for Lesvos and then for Athens.

Handiwork – Colourful patches

“The handiwork of my grandmother, Varvara Ioannidou-Peniadoy from Zoguldak (Nea Heraclia) kept inside it, tightly guarded, the small refugee fortune of the family that had arrived from Istanbul to Thessaloniki in 1924.
Stored deep in the basement of aunt Eleftheria’s house, the handiwork never saw daylight until my grandma, my aunt and Froso (my mother) died and the basement had to be emptied for rent. They did not manage to grasp again the thread of their microhistory, digging deep inside the painful memory. With reverence, I dedicate this to them and reconnect the thread of history that was cut.

I carved a linoleum uterus based on a photo of my daughter Lianka Pandolfini from the theatre play “The Way Home” that she directed and acted in, in 2013 The play focused on the condition of being a refugee. I printed them in the centre of the fabric and in that way four generations of women carrying the same memory unite in a colourful handiwork.” Dimitra Siaterli

Toys

“During the bombing of Sarajevo, we were hiding with my parents in a cellar. My mother tried to distract me so that I would not be afraid; she taught me how to sew and I made these two toys. I have been carrying these mascots with me for 26 years. Together, we made our way to safety. Over time, I realized that these toys do not just bring me happiness but they remind me that one can learn something under all circumstances.” Sanja and Džana Popovič

Dowry agreement

Dowry agreement of the grandmother of Mrs. Theofilidou – Dimitraki, Mrs Kalliopi Christodoulou, an Ottoman citizen. It describes the movable and immovable property that she left behind in the village of Galimi where
she was from, when she came as a refugee in 1922. In return, she was granted an acre estate in Eretria by the Greek state. The estate was eventually removed from her ownership. The reason was that she did not use the property immediately and she moved to Chalkida. The dowry agreement was transferred from Thessaloniki, where they initially traveled, to Eretria, Chalkida, Piraeus and finally to Neos Kosmos, possibly due to the expectation of a more just compensation by the Greek authorities. According to local residents’ testimonies, the relations between the Greeks and the Turks in the area were good. The Greek population was informed in advance about the events in other in advance on the events in other Asia Minor cities, and left before any escalation.

Bank carnet

Families of refugees from Asia Minor, in most cases, where financially supported or granted low interest loans by the Greek state in order to build or buy houses. Lambros Zeibekos, the husband or Calliopi Zeibekou and grand-father of Pitsa Andrinopoulou who narrated the story of her family, was executed during the Asia Minor Catastrophe. This bank carnet notes the pension and allowances that the family received until Mrs. Calliopi’s death.