Outcast Europe

Memories of Displacement and Movement

Outcast Europe

Brick

“The brick comes from the brick construction area of the Greek village of Genitsarohori (or Genitsariotes), 5 km south of Aivali. The inhabitants, apart from agriculture and olive-growing, were engaged in the construction of
bricks and tiles, supplying the whole region of Aivali, with clientele of over 60-70,000 inhabitants, Greeks and Turks. The Genitsarohori brickworks were famous for their durability. Until today, such bricks are found in many houses, all of which are sealed with Greek inscriptions of the place (ΓΕΝΝΙΤΣΑΡΟΧΩΡΙΟΝ, ΓΕΝΙΤΣΑΡ, ΓΕΝΙΤΣΧΩΡ, etc.) and the initials of the manufacturer, like in this case, Θ. Κ.” Thodoris Kontaras

Thodoris Kontaras, a descendant of a family of refugees from Erithrea (Lithri) in Asia Minor, is a teacher and a scholar of Asia Minor civilization. His family settled along with many others from the Erythraean community in the area now called Nea Erythraea and was born in the house in which he still lives today.

Map of Prague

“Both of my brothers have emigrated when I was a child. Miloš was a passionate airplane model builder and in 1962, thanks to his knowledge of air traffic, he managed to slip into an airplane that headed to Canada. In 1969, Tomáš fled to England after being expelled from medical school. In 1988, I managed to escape to Canada. My parents did not live anymore and I was the last one from the wider family who was still here. An escape was an opportunity for me to live close to my brothers. I was granted a permit to travel as a tourist to Austria and once there, I applied for political asylum. It took over a year until Canada agreed to transfer me from Austria. During this time, I stayed in refugee camp in Treiskirchen.” Jiří Navrátil

Door knocker

The Dadioti family belonged to the bourgeoisie of Kydonies (present day Ayvalik) in Asia Minor. In 1915, during the first persecution that the Greeks of Asia Minor were subjected to, the father of the family, Dimitris, was sent to the forced labor camps in Beli-keser, where he died of hardships a few months later. The mother, Anastasia, with the three children, Katina, Dimitra and Vaggelis, abandoned their home and moved temporarily to Istanbul. They came back from there in 1919 when the political circumstances seemed more favorable for the Greeks. The family left again, with the persecution of 1922, first for Lesvos and then for Athens. The door knocker of the house that was built in 1901 was bought in the mid-sixties by Katina Dadioti; she bought it from its Turkish-Cretan owner, the descendant of one Muslim man who came from Crete with the exchange of populations in 1924. Kefalas is the guard and generous lender of all these objects. He has documented the family’s history in the historical novel “Gliko Kidoni”.

Architectural representation

Sketch of the Dadioti family house, in the parish of Zoodochou Pigis (Kato Panagia), which was created by Evangelos Dadiotis in 1922-1923. The Dadioti family belonged to the bourgeoisie of Kydonies (present day Ayvalik) in Asia Minor. In 1915, during the first persecution that the Greeks of Asia Minor were subjected to, the father of the family, Dimitris, was sent to the forced labor camps in Beli-keser, where he died of hardships a few months later. The mother, Anastasia, with the three children, Katina, Dimitra and Vaggelis, abandoned their home and moved temporarily to Istanbul. They came back from there in 1919 when the political circumstances seemed more favorable for the Greeks. The family left again, with the persecution of 1922, first for Lesvos and then for Athens.

Album

Album with the philanthropic institutions of Istanbul. Publication: 1905, Koromila Publishing House, Istanbul. The album belonged to Vaggelis Dadiotis, who left for Istanbul in order to study in 1920, and therefore did not experience the events of ‘22 first hand. He reconnected with his family in 1922 in Mytilene, where they had found temporary refuge.

Christening document

Mrs. Chrysoula Zeibekou arrived as a refugee with her mother and her brother from Izmir to Chios, at the age of 8. Her father was murdered in front of the entire family in Izmir. Her uncle, who was already in Chios, stated from the onset that could not host them. From Chios they went to Naxos where they lived for several years. The sole belongings of the family when they got off the boat were the christening documents of the children and a religious
icon. According to her narrations, Mrs. Chrysoula arrived in Chios with only one shoe that she requested to have polished by the local shoe shiner the moment she reached the port. Some years later they left Naxos and started
a new life in Athens. First, in Kifisia, where she studied in the housewifery school, and then in Imitos, one of the numerous refugee neighborhoods of Athens. The daughter of Mrs. Chrysoula, Pitsa, is still living in the same house.

Rague

“My carpet – my grandmother gave it to me to keep me warm when I was a baby. My blanket and I are inseparable, and from then, it was keeping me warm in the student dorm in Bitola, in the resident halls in Skopje, and now where in Melbourne. I took it with me, not because there are no blankets here, but because it reminds me of my home, my life in Macedonia, and it gives me the warmness of my parents that unfortunately are no longer with us.” Tatiana